Art Through My Eyes: Visiting the High Museum of Atlanta not during Teen Night

  |  Topic: Art, Culture, Opinion
By Kayla Smith
High Museum Kayla Reflection

Art is relative — a representation of the human expression and creative evolution. For centuries, people have been using art to tell a story, preserve a moment in time and even challenge reality itself. I spent the last day of May at the High Museum of Art, and unlike other times I’ve visited, I felt disconnected. I’d usually go to the High for their periodic teen night*, and before I would partake in the festivities of the night, I’d walk around the exhibits, fascinated with their structures and meanings.

The last time I attended teen night, it was during the “Los Trompos” exhibit by Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena in 2015. However, the energy and excitement I had for the museum then has dissipated. I remember how the vibrant colors of the Los Trompos exhibit’s structure captured my attention. My friends and I immediately got in the the spinning seats, and of course, we began to spin the contraption as fast as we could. In the process, I began to revel in childish fun whilst appreciating the designer’s purpose of the exhibit. For me, this exhibit captured the true essence and purpose of art, an entertaining interaction and connection between the creator and the audience. After an hour, my friends and I went around the museum to the other exhibits. No matter where we went, the vibe was relaxing and inviting. From the mellow sounds of music echoing around the building to hypnotic lights in the space, I grew a deeper appreciation for art and its significance in the world.

Maybe the atmosphere and the people who came out to teen night are the reason behind my change in feelings. Walking in last  Wednesday, the museum seemed bare. No music, no moving lights, no selfie stations; it was bare and daunting. Moving aimlessly through the museum, visiting each exhibit, I found myself not relating to the art as I did before.

So, instead of trying to connect to the artwork this time, I decided to connect the artwork to current memes and moods. As goofy as that seems, it not only provided me entertainment, it also allowed me to see that art can still relate to us over time. These four statues, and many more, stood out to me.

However, my perspective may change, because I’m attending the High’s Summer Kick-Off Party this Friday.

High Museum statue spewing lies

The meme I came up for this statue (above) is: How I look when I hear people spewing lies?

High Museum Statues by Kayla

My meme for this statue: To be or not to be messy?

High Museum statue when people start

My meme for this statue: When people wanna start.

High Museum statue 4 by Kayla

My meme for this statue: When it’s been 5 minutes since he last texted you…

*The next teen night isn’t scheduled yet, but the museum’s kick off party is:

Friday, June 23

6-9 p.m.

$14.50 per person

Click here for details.

 

Kayla, 18, is a VOX summer intern and rising freshman at Spelman College.

Photos taken by Maya Martin, VOX summer intern. 

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